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Cigar Review- La Sirena King Poseidon

 

La Sirena King Poseidon (6x60)

La Sirena is a full-bodied cigar that was blended by well-known stogie-masters Nestor Miranda and Don Pepin Garcia for Miami Cigars. The blend features aged Nicaraguan filler and binder tobaccos and a dark Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper, and was the first full-bodied cigar to be produced at Garcia’s My Father Cigars factory in Estelli, Nicaragua. La Sirena, which translates to “the mermaid”, has a mythical sea theme to its branding, featuring sizes like “Trident”, and “King Poseidon”, and sports what might be the biggest band ever to be put on a cigar. Today I procured a sample of the beefy King Poseidon (6×60) vitola, and put it through my rigorous taste test.

This stogie was pretty regal looking, cloaked in a dark and distinguished, silky Connecticut Broadleaf maduro wrapper with a massively sturdy-looking triple cap, the best I had seen in a while. As I mentioned above, the band on this thing was simply huge, covering almost two thirds of the cigar, which actually made for a pretty cool presentation. Pre-light draws didn’t offer much taste, but I could tell that the draw would be wide open, which is just my style.

After lighting up, strong notes of cedar and white pepper with some milk chocolate overtones poured generously out of the cigar. As the pre-light had indicated, this stogie had one of the easiest draws I had ever experienced. The smoke itself had a super-creamy texture, with each puff delivering thick, flavorful plumes. Despite the burly wrapper on the cigar, it was burning nice and straight with no problems.

As I worked my way into the 2nd third, the stogie kept its woody and peppery zest, and a new note of dried fruit sweetness emerged. The stick had a clean, light, and airy feel to it, despite its considerable strength, which I found to be quite enjoyable. Sometimes when delving into the full-bodied category I end up feeling like the cigar is smoking me, and not the other way around, but that was definitely not the case with this stick. At this point I noticed little shimmering specks on the wrapper that looked like glitter, that were present even in the ash. This was the first time I had seen anything like this on a cigar, but it looked to be a natural quality of the wrapper, maybe the result of mineral deposits in the rich soil it was grown in. I wasn’t really sure, but I thought it was pretty cool anyway. Also, after reaching the point where I had to remove the gargantuan band, I discovered another little band underneath, which was a nice touch.

The last third brought on a change of flavors, in which the taste notes darkened. The chocolate turned to a dark cocoa, the cedar to oak, and the white pepper to black. This made for a more robust taste, but the cigar remained balanced and smooth, and not at all muddled in flavor. In fact, a very clean light-cream note piped up towards the very end, making for a really nice finish.

The La Sirena was a really enjoyable smoke for me. It burned slowly and evenly, required no touch ups, and to say the draw was effortless would be an understatement. This one was truly maintenance-free. Besides the excellent performance, this cigar had phenomenal flavor that never wavered. While I wouldn’t consider it very complex, it had just enough interesting nuances to add depth to its conservative flavor notes.  It was definitely full in body, but  it’s not a cigar that I would recommend only for “seasoned” smokers, as it had an easy-going character to it that even a casual smoker would be able to appreciate. I have to tip my hat to Mr. Miranda, and Mr. Garcia for this one, and give it an A grade. I would jump at the chance to smoke La Sirena again.

 

 

 

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